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Religions of Late Antiquity Seminar

The Religions of Late Antiquity Seminar meets on selected Mondays in the Lightfoot Room in the Divinity Faculty at 2pm. The seminar gathers graduate students, scholars and visiting scholars in the University interested in religions of late antiquity (Christianity, Judaism, cults of the Greco-Roman and near eastern worlds) and their interactions. It shares a common interest with the Cambridge Late Antiquity Network Seminars (CLANS), which engage with the late antique and early medieval periods from a range of disciplines and interdisciplinary perspectives (including Classics, History, Theology and Religious Studies). It is chaired by Dr Thomas Graumann and Dr Sophie Lunn-Rockliffe. In Michaelmas 2019 the seminar takes up the theme of the reading group from Michaelmas 2017, which read a range of commentaries on Psalm 1, and focuses on Ambrose’s commentary on Psalm 1 (Ambrose, Explanatio Psalmorum XII, ed. M. Petschenig and rev. M. Zelzer, CSEL 64 (2nd ed., 1999); trans. Íde M. Ní Riain, Commentary of Saint Ambrose on Twelve Psalms (Dublin, 2000)). Sessions will be held at 2pm in the Lightfoot Room in the Divinity Faculty on October 21st, November 4th, November 18th and December 2nd. All who have interests in Patristic commentary, biblical exegesis, the history of reading and reception of Psalms and so on, are welcome to attend these sessions. In Lent and Easter 2020 the seminar will host papers from both invited visitors and Cambridge scholars on a range of topics in the broad area of the religions of late antiquity. All colleagues, MPhil and PhD students in RoLA or other areas (such as Classics, History and Philosophy), from within and outside the faculty, are warmly welcome. If you need further information, please contact Dr Thomas Graumann tg236@cam.ac.uk or Dr Sophie Lunn-Rockliffe. Sjl39@cam.ac.uk

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