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Religions of Late Antiquity Pathway

Daniel in the lions' den (Museo Arqueológico y Etnológico de Córdoba, Spain)
Daniel in the lions' den (Museo Arqueológico y Etnológico de Córdoba, Spain)
The Religions of Late Antiquity MPhil Pathway and Modules

Late antiquity - covering broadly the post-classical period, and ranging within and beyond the Mediterranean world – was characterised by vigorous religious pluralism, itself varying from the sharing and coexistence of traditions to religious competition and even conflict. Scholarly study of the religions of the period has burgeoned in the last half-century, seen in the array of exciting work contextualizing and comparing religious texts, practices and cultures, from established fields of study from ‘patristics’ to ‘rabbinics’, to emerging fields such as ‘pagan monotheism’ and ‘ritual power’. Students taking this pathway in 2018-19 will take the dedicated module ‘Christians in late antique Alexandria’, and may choose a second module from other pathways, depending on their interests and skills. From 2019-20, a second module will be offered 'Books, Readers and Interpreters'.

Note on the pathway: Students accepted for the pathway ‘Religions of Late Antiquity’ who wish to focus on Christianity (the ‘Patristic’ route) are expected to take both modules of study and to offer a dissertation on a Patristic topic. They should have a demonstrable knowledge of at least one of the major ancient languages used by Christians of the time (Latin, Greek, Syriac), and be willing to do further language work as part of the MPhil. For the second, specifically ‘Patristic’ module (in 2019: ‘Christianity in Late Antique Alexandria’), participation is also subject to proven prior experience of the study of late antique Christianity. Students interested in participating in this module should consult the course co-ordinator in advance, who will determine whether their language and subject experience is sufficient.

Modules:

Christians in Late Antique Alexandria  Books, Readers and Interpreters 
Roman Amphitheatre, Alexandria Ambrose Reading (Stadtkirche, Langenzenn, ca. 1445)